Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

I couldn't resist rising to the "tune of the week" bait. Monymusk and I have been old friends for a long time. Here's one of versions I know on banjo and accordion, and a couple just on accordion. I learned this tune mostly by osmosis, and I play it differently on different instruments. When fiddlers play it it's generally in A

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Comment by Paul Draper on May 14, 2013 at 11:58am

Really nice, Ian.

Comment by Rob Morrison on May 14, 2013 at 12:53pm
Ian--That was great! Last time I saw somebody play a diatonic accordion was about thirty years ago by a fellow in a band from Canada called La Bottine Souriant. Are those things common north of the border?--Rob
Comment by Tim Twiss on May 14, 2013 at 12:57pm
Way cool. I appreciate hearing the Strathspey and the color and phrasing the accordion offers.
Comment by Ian Bell on May 14, 2013 at 1:11pm
The single row kind I play (which is basically the same as a Cajun accordion) is very common in Quebec and Newfoundland. Less so in Ontario where I live, and where the fiddle has always been king for this sort of music. I took it up when I was about 20 because I wanted to play jigs and reels but the fiddle seemed too complicated. I used to run into the odd old timer who played around here but I mostly listened to Quebecois and Scottish players when I was learning.
I'm guessing it was Yves Lambert playing accordion with La Bottine when you saw them (What a band!)
Comment by Steve Jeter on May 14, 2013 at 1:39pm

that is excellent!  great combo,   you got gumbo in your combo

Comment by Strumelia on May 14, 2013 at 3:28pm

YUMMMMMMMMEEEEEEEEE!!!!   :D

Love it!!!

this kind of sound always makes me think of sailors dancing on board ship, for some reason...  ??

Comment by rick Ceballos on May 14, 2013 at 4:58pm

Very cool Ian, I play a two row button accordion which is fairly common in New England

Comment by Al Smitley on May 15, 2016 at 5:57pm

Seems like we discussed this but I don't see it here.  I usually play the 3rd and 4th parts, too, but do you know the provenance of it?  Seems like the Ford Orchestra used 4 parts but I don't know if it predates the Ford Orchestra or not.

Comment by Ian Bell on May 15, 2016 at 6:12pm
I think those variations (more-or-less) Can be found in "Ryan's Mammoth Collection" and its offspring, Cole's "One Thousand Fiddle Tunes". My long-time fiddling partner Anne Lederman had yet another part that went down to a flat seven part, like a pipe tune.

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