Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

Here is a dark and mysterious tune that lurks toward the end of the Converse Analytical Method of 1886. It's full of varied rhythmic figures and written in p...

Views: 106

Comment by Sylvia on November 8, 2011 at 10:40am
Great for next Halloween. I like it.
Comment by Tim Twiss on November 8, 2011 at 11:03am
I'd like to hear someone do it with a fretted banjo banjo tuned up to the Rice "E" tuning...might change the feel and articulation.
Comment by Ian Bell on November 8, 2011 at 7:24pm
Great stuff - puts me in mind of one of those Bach solo cello pieces
Comment by Tim Twiss on November 8, 2011 at 9:44pm

Thanks Ian. You played this one? There are so many pulls written into it. Still not quite sure what to make of it.

Comment by Ian Bell on November 10, 2011 at 8:25pm

I haven't taken a run at it yet. I'll be sure to report when I do. I've currently got my hands full learning some old Metis fiddle tunes on the "modern" 5-string, for a concert next week. Great tunes, but crooked as a dog's hind leg - dropped and added beats at every turn. Playing the minstrel stuff has actually helped me in this area in that It's freed my right thumb from the tyranny of "bum-ditty" (not that there's anything wrong with that)

Comment by Strumelia on October 1, 2012 at 8:42pm

Great great sound, Tim.  A real spooky tune!

Love the little end, love the way the light shines through the banjer skin....  

Comment by Tim Twiss on October 1, 2012 at 8:53pm

Yea, minor tunes on a low fretless. It's good!

Comment by Strumelia on October 2, 2012 at 9:53am

Tim, is it actually a different tuning, or just a standard tutor tuning?

Comment by Tim Twiss on October 2, 2012 at 10:22am

Standard...

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