Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

Written by Frank B. Converse, the banjo notation is found in "Converse's Analytical Banjo Method" of 1886. Played on a Bell & Son minstrel banjo.

Tags: Converse
Favorite of 1 person

Comment by Tim Twiss on January 25, 2014 at 6:13pm
Clean as a whistle. Very nice.
Comment by Wes Merchant on January 25, 2014 at 6:17pm

Nice!

Comment by Bob Lanham on January 25, 2014 at 6:19pm

Thanks, Tim.  I wish I had a lighter touch on it, but hopefully that will come with time.

By the way, there was already a tab in the photo library, by Mark D. Smith.  So thanks to Mark for that!

Comment by Bob Lanham on January 25, 2014 at 6:29pm

Correction, the tab is in the forum.

Comment by Strumelia on January 25, 2014 at 6:36pm

Awesome!

I think the touch is just right!  That banjer sounds terrific.

Comment by Tim Twiss on January 25, 2014 at 7:02pm

Why would you change your touch? It's great. Strong and clear.

Comment by Paul Draper on January 25, 2014 at 8:12pm

Sounds great!

Comment by Mark Weems on January 26, 2014 at 12:45am

Two thumb strings up!

Comment by Bell Banjos on January 26, 2014 at 6:51pm

What equipment did you record this with, Bob? You captured the deep, hollow sound and it sounds dynamic, although there must be some compression. I'm curious because this is a very realistic sound.

Comment by Bob Lanham on January 26, 2014 at 8:35pm

To make this video, I used a Canon VIXIA HFM40 camera.  The 2 keys to making it sound good are that I use a Canon shotgun mic mounted on the hot shoe, and I use MANUAL audio level.  This is the natural sound, with no EQ, no compression.  I only used iMovie to trim the ends and share it to YouTube.

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