Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

One of the oldest Minstrel tunes in the book. It has roots in English folk tradition. I'm not not claiming this to be a Minstrel type reproduction, but rather my own interpretation.

Views: 190

Comment by John Masciale on December 10, 2011 at 2:41pm

Very good Tim.  It's great to see such a difference between the way we approached this.

Comment by Ian Bell on December 10, 2011 at 2:42pm

Hoo Haw. That's a good set of words. I like the dance references.

I've heard the morris dancing types sing,

"Some like coffee, some like tea, I like a pretty girl on on my knee - Sich a gettin' etc...".

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2011 at 10:08pm

Is there a "knick knack paddy whack" in there?

That's about all I could hear after a week.

Comment by Al Smitley on December 11, 2011 at 5:33am

I enjoyed both versions.  I always seek out verses which refer to contemporary issues such as the one about "colonization" and "amalgamation", and "sarmon, "Bout temperance".  Can anyone enlighten me on "seven up"?   I did a quick look on the internet and in a couple of American history sources and failed to enlighten myself.

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 11, 2011 at 6:36am

Isn't it a card game...I guess associated with gambling?

Comment by Al Smitley on December 11, 2011 at 6:42am

Ah, drinking & gambling.  That makes sense.  I guess, in the back of my mind, In knew that "seven up" was a card game but couldn't bring it to the front of my mind until you mentioned it.  Thanks,.......and what are you doing up so early?!  I have been unable to sleep-in since retiring, but what's your problem, Tim?  ;)

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 11, 2011 at 6:47am

I am up to go play at church.

Comment by Al Smitley on December 11, 2011 at 7:08am

Ah, that was in the back of my mind, as well.

Comment by John Masciale on December 11, 2011 at 9:08am

We're on our way to church as well,  2 services, 2 different sets of music.  At least this time of year it is Advent/Christmas, so there is some similarity.

 

You can still find the rules to seven-up in card game books.  That verse has an interesting phrase, "kin of varmin".  Tim interpreted it one way, I interpreted it another.  Tim sang kin with a long I, assuming it was the word kind .  I debated that, and sang it with a soft i, as in kin - family of.  Both are valid.  Elaine has been doing word studies in the songs, identifying what a number of the odd phrases and references are.  It is really fascinating.

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 11, 2011 at 11:40am

Another one...the pronounciation of Susquehanna.

I said sus KEE....making an assumption that that is the intended.

Yes, this one is loaded with historical references. I think a presenter at AEBG who was knowledgeable of all 19th Century references in these tunes would be welcomed...doesn't even have to be a musician. 

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