Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

From Frank Converse's ANALYTICAL BANJO METHOD, 1886

Views: 106

Comment by Chris Prieto on December 9, 2015 at 6:39pm

nice, it's a fancier git up in de morning?

Comment by Paul Draper on December 9, 2015 at 10:11pm
yep, a Conversion of git up in the morning
Comment by Ian Bell on December 10, 2015 at 9:08am

Very elegant!

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2015 at 12:42pm

Many in the banjo section of the Analytical are reworked. A really interesting study to see the the refinement of...and not the radicalization of...the earlier style. 

Comment by Chris Prieto on December 10, 2015 at 1:43pm

@Tim I actually gave you're analytical playlist a listen yesterday and did note the evolution of many tunes. In one video you did this sort of chop/slap across all the strings that created a strum sound. I tried a few times last niight to no avail but it looks fancy :)

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2015 at 1:59pm

Have to watch some of those ascending passages. Many are measured time, but some are nail glides all the way up. They often become confused and end up as all nail glides.....but the challenge is to keep even measured time on those.

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2015 at 2:14pm

You'll hear a lot of the things that one guy played on the wax cylinder from the turn of the century...I forget his name. the Reb....

Comment by Strumelia on December 10, 2015 at 4:58pm

Nice job Paul.  :)

So, this strikes me as actually BEING 'GitUpInTheMornin'...with a few fancy fingerings thrown in.  I have to wonder then- did Converse present this as a different tune?...and if so, did he claim himself as the composer?  That would strike me as pretty over the top if so.

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2015 at 5:02pm

Over the top..under the strings...and all around. Stake your claim ladies and gentlemen. May the best title win. There are SO many doubled titles...even without so much as a shift of a note. Here at least....he twists it a bit. 

Comment by Tim Twiss on December 10, 2015 at 5:26pm

From my observation, this work is a culmination and summary of all the major tune "types" found 30 years ago.

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