Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

Hey all, this is a very selfish post. Is anyone able to photo or pdf a copy of "Railroad Polka" and either post it as pictures, like Tim does, or just send it to me? I have been trying to track it down and keep getting wrong books and the like. Thanks!

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I put it in the Huddle Workspace.
See if you can find and open it.
Here also
Attachments:
Awesome tune. I learned it at Greg's suggestion. I dream of being able to hit those triplets in the last section consistently.
Yea, I actually had it stuck in my head and Greg told me what it was. Those triplets, are a bitch!!! but they are fun too. Thanks for the sheet music Tim!!!
Hard indeed. Bar 8 indicates guitar technique, unless I'm missing something obvious. That octave A must surely be played with guitar technique. Yes, you could play the upper octave on the third string, but that doesn't seem to be indicated. Mind you, guitar technique doesn't make the triplets easier!
Here's TAB if anyone wants it. Cool tune...the version Tim plays on his CD is #1 in my book.
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Thanks for the tab Marc. Beware M10....it's all "E", no F#.
I found a few alternate takes to this tune I'll share in a bit.

Trapdoor2 said:
Here's TAB if anyone wants it. Cool tune...the version Tim plays on his CD is #1 in my book.
Beware M10....it's all "E", no F#.


I mean M16 (damn bifocals)
I don't think you are missing "something obvious" Rob. Great analysis.

It's wonderful how we have been collectively working to reconcile the structural side of Buckley's 1860 (since he doesn't talk explicitly about playing in fingerstyle, though many of us have effectively discerned how fingerstyle structurally and logically fits into his vocal and instrumental pieces). As part of my own way of dealing with/experimenting with downstroke fingering solutions in Buckley 1860, I have innovated for myself what I think of as a more-or-less simultaneous downstroke between my lead finger and thumb for those downbeat octaves between, in this case, the 2nd and 4th strings. This is also the way I play the opening of Japanese Grand March.

Regarding those triplets, I do a single string alternation between my thumb and lead finger on a single string: http://www.youtube.com/banjargreg#p/u/8/o16wy7tt0u8
Some folks will do double stops to get those notes in a downstroke. I've been working on single string alternations (with variable consistency) based on a more literal interpretation of several pieces in Briggs 1855. Regarding the first string, there are at least twelve occurrences where Briggs’ Banjo Instructor notates the thumb playing on the first string in an alternating motion with the finger: Ephraim’s Lament (3), Injun Rubber Overcoat (4), Pitch Burgundy Plaster (3), Jordan is a Hard Road to Travel (2). Applying this principle to Railroad Polk, I've elected to use a thumb lead to begin the triplet.

This is really fun stuff!
Later,
Greg

Rob MacKillop said:
Hard indeed. Bar 8 indicates guitar technique, unless I'm missing something obvious. That octave A must surely be played with guitar technique. Yes, you could play the upper octave on the third string, but that doesn't seem to be indicated. Mind you, guitar technique doesn't make the triplets easier!
To make it worse, I am transposing it into G ;D That is a very nice tab. Almost like the sheet music in the respect there is no fingering suggestions. I see what you mean about M16 Tim, it stays right on the E and never hops back up in the Buckley score as if to lead you in. I like the disco feel :D

Thanks everyone!!!
Yah, now that you point it out, I remember disliking the string of Es in m16. I prefer the lead in...even if it ain't completely authentic.

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