Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

Here are some materials Greg and I (Tim Twiss) put together for the Harpers Ferry Early Banjo Workshop Weekend. This is certainly starting from the beginning, but it cuts no corners, and is not watered down or sugar coated. It is simply the authentic instruction form the original tutors put together in a logical, progressive manner. All newbies are welcome to try this material out, and give feedback to let us know if it was helpful in your learning. It starts with providing a solid understanding of the technique, and moves into repertoire as soon as possible.  

 

Here are links to the video, covering the material in the book.

 

http://minstrelbanjo.ning.com/video/harpers-ferry-1

http://minstrelbanjo.ning.com/video/harpers-ferry2

http://minstrelbanjo.ning.com/video/harpers-ferry-3

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pages 4-6
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Pages 7-9
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Pages 10-11
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page 12-14
(note...wrong note in "Essesnce")
Correction to follow...unless ya can find it!
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Page 15-17
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I'm glad you've gotten around to posting the print version. I found it very helpful when I attended the Harper's Ferry event.

Dick
Those of you who will be using this material, notice the fingerings in the TAB. It will mirror the experience of the notation...for better or for worse. It will give you reference points to look at the notation. Associations such as these will wean you into the notation as you glance up to see where you are. Pretty soon the numbers and the notes start to gel together...I mean, there aren't that many of them, you know. Just different patterns (which will also become recognizable).
With the TABs how do you know which fret to play the notes on? I understand that the numbers are the fingers and the lines are the strings but how do I know where on the fret board to play the notes?

Do you have a pdf that explains where the notes are on the banjo fret board? I know the notes on a guitar and I can read music, but starting out new on the banjo I don't know where the notes are.

Any help you can give would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Tim Twiss said:
Those of you who will be using this material, notice the fingerings in the TAB. It will mirror the experience of the notation...for better or for worse. It will give you reference points to look at the notation. Associations such as these will wean you into the notation as you glance up to see where you are. Pretty soon the numbers and the notes start to gel together...I mean, there aren't that many of them, you know. Just different patterns (which will also become recognizable).
See "Appendix Rosetta".

Daniel Pownall said:
With the TABs how do you know which fret to play the notes on? I understand that the numbers are the fingers and the lines are the strings but how do I know where on the fret board to play the notes?

Do you have a pdf that explains where the notes are on the banjo fret board? I know the notes on a guitar and I can read music, but starting out new on the banjo I don't know where the notes are.

Any help you can give would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Tim Twiss said:
Those of you who will be using this material, notice the fingerings in the TAB. It will mirror the experience of the notation...for better or for worse. It will give you reference points to look at the notation. Associations such as these will wean you into the notation as you glance up to see where you are. Pretty soon the numbers and the notes start to gel together...I mean, there aren't that many of them, you know. Just different patterns (which will also become recognizable).
Daniel, the numbers ARE the frets. The left-hand finger indications are absent.
That makes more sense now. Thank you.

Rob MacKillop said:
Daniel, the numbers ARE the frets. The left-hand finger indications are absent.
New new players, I just posted 2 pages from "Winner's New Primer for the Banjo" from 1864. If you can't read notes, use the Banjo Rosetta from this site. There are only a few notes, but it is another perspective on right hand fingering. Compare it to the Briggs' Movements. It is good for the hand, and the brain. If you want to try some of the Winner's material, look it up...Greg and I posted several a year or so ago....music with our own fingerings as well as video. See topic "Winner's New Primer".
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