Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

A list of 10-15 short tunes that folks can brush up on and have ready for sessions at the gathering.

 

I'll start

 

"Antietam Jig," Converse "Green" page 27.  Key of D, to be played as if the banjo was pitched in "A" and not "Briggs."

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Money Musk (many sources)

Foster's Jig (aka Octaroon Jig, Boston Jig, etc., also many sources)

Frank Converses' Jig (Buckley 1868)

Butler's Jig (Converse Yellow)

I am bringing a gourd banjo. Anybody else? It is best tuned up to "E".  
Camptown Hornpipe, Tonawanda Hornpipe, Peanut Gal, Luke West's Walk Round

I'm bringing my gourd as well. 

Ian,  when you say Peanut Gal, which one, Buckley or Converse?

I think Wood Up Quickstep would be a good addition.  I would also suggest we all bring copies of Briggs if we have them.

I was thinking of the Buckley Peanut Gal (just cause that's the one I play!)
Here are a couple of different flavors of Foster's Jig.  This is in both D and E.
Attachments:

There's 3 versions of Money Musk in the tutors,  here they are for comparison:

 

Attachments:

Joel--

How 'bout "The Glendy Burke," the song Tim just posted.  Coincidentally I played that tune yesterday at Duke Homestead , where I'm now immortalized in the men's restroom (see my previous post).  It's a great Steven Foster song  and more importantly I already know it.---Rob Morrison

Joel -

Antietam Jig's a great little tune. Thanks for thowing out the challenge. I've shied away from tunes that aren't in the "home" banjo keys, but this wasn't much of a strain. 

I'm working on it both ways, as if it were in Brigg's tuning, as well as in Converse's.  We could actually try doing a step up, playing it one time in one key, and the next higher.  I'm finding it to be a little cofusing this way, but it's a good exercise;  and I agree, it's a great little tune.

One more for the AEBG IV jam song list--  "Weston's Frolic."  This is important so please pay attention.

 

The tune can be found in Buckley's Guide for the Banjo, published in 1868.  Joel Hooks has been doing considerable research on Horace Weston and he believes that this tune is a Horace Weston tune.  It is a minor-key 'stop-jig.'  It certainly has many similarities with other Weston tunes, harmonically and rhythmically.  And the fact that Horace Weston was working for the Buckleys in the mid 1860's make it a good candidate for a Weston original.

 

One other thing, when you look this tune up in Buckley's Guide for the Banjo (in PDF in the Banjo Clubhouse) you will find it titled "Niggers Frolic."  And since nice girls and boys don't use that word any more we have decided to call "Weston's Frolic."

 

Work it up people!  And we will honor a great American and a great banjoist.  See you in a few days.

Will do Carl!

Carl Anderton said:

One more for the AEBG IV jam song list--  "Weston's Frolic."  This is important so please pay attention.

 

The tune can be found in Buckley's Guide for the Banjo, published in 1868.  Joel Hooks has been doing considerable research on Horace Weston and he believes that this tune is a Horace Weston tune.  It is a minor-key 'stop-jig.'  It certainly has many similarities with other Weston tunes, harmonically and rhythmically.  And the fact that Horace Weston was working for the Buckleys in the mid 1860's make it a good candidate for a Weston original.

 

One other thing, when you look this tune up in Buckley's Guide for the Banjo (in PDF in the Banjo Clubhouse) you will find it titled "Niggers Frolic."  And since nice girls and boys don't use that word any more we have decided to call "Weston's Frolic."

 

Work it up people!  And we will honor a great American and a great banjoist.  See you in a few days.

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