Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

How did we all end up playing in G/D and why do we do it????

Is this a "pot roast"??

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After sending it I thought, "I shouldn't presume to know what Wes meant!", but I guess it was Ok.
As I said before, I've often heard fiddlers say they don't play in the flat keys because they are difficult.
I say, that the flat keys are difficult because they don't play in them.......and they are missing out on some good tunes.

Looking for some unrelated information I came across something of interest for this discussion.  This one had skipped my mind.

It is Albert Baur's 26th letter to the Stewart Journal.  For those who don't know the name, Baur was one of the few soldiers who fought on the ACW that we can actually place a banjo in his hands during the war.

He was also very accurate in his dates as he wrote the date on the corner of every piece of paper he received or wrote (there is still some of this extant including some Frank Converse manuscript).  Because of this he is very reliable in his reminiscences.

This letter covers this very topic by someone who lived though it.

Also of interest is his statement about the man who wrote the Briggs' tutor.  Earlier in his letters he said that Frank Converse told him he wrote it.  Now in this letter he claims that the man who wrote it is still living and known to all banjo lovers.  He and Converse were friends and kept in touch.  Evidence points strongly towards Converse being the true author of the Briggs tutor.

Please read it and we can discuss it some more!

Attachments:

That was a good read. We should have looked at it when we were discussing the G/D and A/E thing. He certainly does not mention Briggs' as though it had little to do with the way the banjo was played back then. Interesting that he says Briggs as G/D was the exception.

Or.....let's keep it going. It's a great topic.

Where was 'A' and when?   When did 440 become 'A'?  It seems this would be part of the discussion and I'm thinking it must've been and I missed it.  I confess that I didn't read this thread that closely.

I tell ya, I am really enjoying my instrument in E / A.  The response, tone, and intonation difference is notable.

I think you carry a couple with you....just like a harmonica player


This is such a good read. I encourage everybody to check this out. E/A.....WAY more common.

Joel Hooks said:

Looking for some unrelated information I came across something of interest for this discussion.  This one had skipped my mind.

It is Albert Baur's 26th letter to the Stewart Journal.  For those who don't know the name, Baur was one of the few soldiers who fought on the ACW that we can actually place a banjo in his hands during the war.

He was also very accurate in his dates as he wrote the date on the corner of every piece of paper he received or wrote (there is still some of this extant including some Frank Converse manuscript).  Because of this he is very reliable in his reminiscences.

This letter covers this very topic by someone who lived though it.

Also of interest is his statement about the man who wrote the Briggs' tutor.  Earlier in his letters he said that Frank Converse told him he wrote it.  Now in this letter he claims that the man who wrote it is still living and known to all banjo lovers.  He and Converse were friends and kept in touch.  Evidence points strongly towards Converse being the true author of the Briggs tutor.

Please read it and we can discuss it some more!

Thanks Joel that is quite informative.

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