Minstrel Banjo

For enthusiasts of early banjo

The flageolet is a bit messy in this one. I was improvising, more or less. Lyrics: Massa's such a stingy man, And every body knows him; He never pays his tai...

Views: 102

Comment by Timothy Twiss on June 12, 2018 at 6:36pm

That is O Pray Goody from Briggs'. I always wondered what the source was. Thanks. And, nice job.

Comment by Chris Prieto on June 12, 2018 at 6:59pm

That was great!

Comment by Matthew Menice on June 12, 2018 at 7:01pm

Thank you, Mr. Twiss and Mr. Prieto. I saw Carl Anderton play this song, so I thought I'd give it a go.

Comment by Strumelia on June 14, 2018 at 12:17pm

The loose playing of the flageolet here is totally charming.  Can you post a picture of yours?  and How is it different than a pennywhistle?

Nice!

Comment by Strumelia on June 14, 2018 at 12:18pm

Note also... another old image with the triangle in the minstrel lineup.

Comment by John Masciale on June 14, 2018 at 3:30pm

Well done!  Strumelia, we have been using the triangle more frequently, it really does add to the music. Elaine and I are rather annoyed with the Geico triangle solo.  We were doing one years before that commercial came out...

Comment by Matthew Menice on June 14, 2018 at 5:59pm

Upon further research, I found out that, as well as being a woodwind, a flageolet was another title they used for a pennywhistle. Probably because they sound so similar. That being said, I am only using a pennywhistle. I simply called it a flageolet as an attempt to sound historically accurate. Looking through archive.org, and the works of Elias Howe, (of Ethiopian Glee Book fame) I found that he released a song book for flageolet including a few minstrel songs. And I am planning on getting a triangle soon! I just wonder what material they were made out of then...

Comment by Strumelia on June 14, 2018 at 7:23pm

Matthew... awesome!

Comment by Richard Katz on June 14, 2018 at 8:22pm

Comment by Strumelia on June 15, 2018 at 8:56am

Yes, old flageolets were made from wood bodies and were quite fancy.  From the picture, the whole head/hole/keys arrangement looks substantially different from simple pennywhistles or fifes.  Though I too recall reading somewhere that people sometimes called PWs 'flageolets' at some place or time.

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